Indian J Sex Transm Dis Indian J Sex Transm Dis
Official Publication of the Indian Association for the Study of Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Indian J Sex Transm Dis
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2009  |  Volume : 30  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 10-15

Clinico-epidemiological profile of HIV/TB coinfected patients in Vadodara, Gujarat


1 Vadodara Medical College, Vadodara, Gujarat, India
2 Division of Infectious Diseases and International Medicine, Department of Global Health, University of South Florida, USA
3 Division of Infectious Diseases and International Medicine, University of South Florida, USA
4 Department of Global Health, University of South Florida, USA

Correspondence Address:
Eknath Naik
Emergency Department, James A Haley Veterans Hospital, 13000 Bruce B. Downs Blvd, Tampa, FL 33612
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0253-7184.55472

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Introduction: The HIV epidemic has posed major, almost insurmountable, challenges to tuberculosis control efforts across the world. This study analyzes the prevalence and disease profile of HIV/AIDS coinfection in Vadodara, Gujarat, India. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in the HIV Referral Clinic at Vadodara, India. Using convenience sampling method, 246 HIV-positive patients coinfected with tuberculosis were enrolled. A detailed history of every case was taken followed by a thorough physical examination. Baseline and follow up laboratory and radiological investigations were carried out as appropriately warranted. Results: Out of 500 HIV positive patients who presented to the clinic during the study period, 246 (49.2%) were coinfected with tuberculosis. Out of 246 coinfected cases, 35(14.2%) presented with demonstrable and documented tuberculosis whereas in 211(85.8%) cases, tuberculosis was extemporaneously detected by actively screening the patients. Sixty nine percent of patients were males, while 10.5% of cases were below fifteen years of age. The majority (68%) of patients had manifestations of extrapulmonary tuberculosis; but pulmonary tuberculosis, which is a more common presentation in HIV-negative cases, was present in only fifty five percent of this segment of the population. Abdominal tuberculosis was the most common site (74%) amongst extrapulmonary tuberculosis involvement, followed by clinically palpable lymph nodes (22%) and pleural effusion (17%). Conclusion: The prevalence of tuberculosis in HIV-positive patients in this study (49%) was substantially higher than that reported in previous studies. However, this could be attributed to a selection and/or a diagnosis bias. This study used abdominal ultrasound for the diagnosis of tuberculosis which might have obviously increased the prevalence. Moreover, these cases were not confirmed by biopsy or other definitive TB diagnostic methods.


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