Indian J Sex Transm Dis Indian J Sex Transm Dis
Official Publication of the Indian Association for the Study of Sexually Transmitted Diseases
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 39  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 28-33

Metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease risk assessment among human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy


1 Department of Medicine, St. John's Medical College, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
2 Karnataka Health Promotion Trust, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
3 Lady Willingdon TB Centre, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
4 St John's Research Institute, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
5 NACO, New Delhi, India
6 Department of Paediatrics, St. John's Medical College, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Jyothi Idiculla
Department of Medicine, St. John's Medical College, Bengaluru - 560 034, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijstd.IJSTD_89_16

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Background: The association of cardiovascular risk with first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Indians has been a matter of concern with the background of a high risk in South Asians. Aims: This study aimed to compare metabolic syndrome and its components, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and cardiovascular risk among patients on first-line ART (Group 1) with age-matched, ART-naïve human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients (Group 2) and normal controls (Group 3). Methods: Patients attending a tertiary care center in Mysore were enrolled in the study after obtaining informed consent and controls were chosen from relatives of patients. Results: The total number of patients enrolled in the study was 217 (males 111; females 106), and the mean age of these patients was 34.1 ± 7.4 years. The number of patients in Group 1 (HIV+, ART experienced) was 76; in Group 2 (HIV+, ART naïve) was 71, and in Group 3 (HIV−) was 70. There was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome between the three groups. On comparing the components of metabolic syndrome, serum triglycerides (mg/dl) were significantly higher in the ART group (Group 1: 149.5 [interquartile range (IQR): 84–187], Group 2: 108 [IQR: 74–152], and Group 3: 141.5 [IQR: 89–192]; P = 0.014) and serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was higher in HIV-uninfected individuals (Group 1: 37.5 ± 11.83, Group 2: 31.5 ± 12.23, and Group 3: 40.1 ± 12.09; P = 0.0002). There was no association between metabolic syndrome, duration of HIV, and type of first-line ART. Total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol were significantly higher in the ART group. Homeostatic model assessment and Framingham scores did not reveal any significant difference across the three groups. Conclusion: HIV-infected individuals on ART had higher levels of triglycerides, LDL, and total cholesterol, but no increased cardiovascular risk compared to other groups.


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