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  Table of Contents  
LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 40  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 77-78
 

Rising trends of herpes simplex virus - 1: A global public health concern


1 Vice Principal Curriculum, Department of Community Medicine, Member of the Medical Education Unit and Institute Research Council, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Kancheepuram, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth, India
2 Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Kancheepuram, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth, India

Date of Web Publication10-May-2019

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Saurabh RamBihariLal Shrivastava
Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, 3rd Floor, Ammapettai Village, Thiruporur - Guduvancherry Main Road, Sembakkam Post, Kancheepuram - 603 108, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijstd.IJSTD_121_15

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How to cite this article:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS, Ramasamy J. Rising trends of herpes simplex virus - 1: A global public health concern. Indian J Sex Transm Dis 2019;40:77-8

How to cite this URL:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS, Ramasamy J. Rising trends of herpes simplex virus - 1: A global public health concern. Indian J Sex Transm Dis [serial online] 2019 [cited 2019 Nov 17];40:77-8. Available from: http://www.ijstd.org/text.asp?2019/40/1/77/257882


Sir,

The herpes simplex virus (HSV) has been categorized into HSV-1 and HSV-2.[1] Regardless of the limitation to have a precise estimate of the caseload, the infectious disease is globally prevalent.[1] The available global estimates suggest that more than 3.6 billion people (<50 years of age) have been diagnosed with HSV-1 infection worldwide.[1],[2]

Considering the risk that herpes infections are transmissible even during asymptomatic stages, it becomes the responsibility of the health sector to strengthen the surveillance activities to obtain the actual caseload of the disease.[1],[2],[3] Furthermore, the sequels of HSV-1 are detrimental, as the condition is painful, hampers the quality of life, and aggravates the problem of stigma/psychological distress in the infected persons.[1],[2],[3]

Moreover, evidence of the emergence of resistance against acyclovir and its derivatives have been reported.[4],[5] The rate of resistance has been quite less among immunocompetent individuals, as the duration of the treatment is short.[4],[5] On the other hand, among immunocompromised patients, the incidence of antiviral resistance is alarmingly high, owing to the prolonged duration of therapy.[4],[5] The presence of all the above factors makes HSV infection as a major public health concern, and thus makes it the responsibility of the concerned stakeholders to create awareness about the disease and enhance health-seeking behavior.[1],[2],[3],[4],[5]

Considering the caseload of the infection, global presence, predilection to infect persons from all socioeconomic strata, and with no curative option available, giving more attention towards the strengthening of the preventive domains of the disease remains a key area in ensuring a decline in the incidence of the disease.[1],[2],[3],[4] Further, the promotion of appropriate use of effective drugs will play a significant role in reducing the risk of transmission, as well as ensuring wellbeing.[1],[2] In addition, the World Health Organization advocates for the expedition of the research activities to promote the development of HSV vaccines.[1],[3]

In conclusion, herpes infection remains a major public health concern and owing to the different challenges associated with its prevention or management front; it is high time that the stakeholders prioritize the issue of prevention of the disease.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

 
   References Top

1.
World Health Organization. Herpes Simplex Virus – Fact Sheet N 400; 2017. Available from: http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs400/en/. [Last accessed on 2017 Aug 18].  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
World Health Organization. Globally, an Estimated Two-Thirds of the Population under 50 are Infected with Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1; 2015. Available from: http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2015/herpes/en/. [Last accessed on 2017 Aug 18].  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
World Health Organization. Call for more Research and Greater Efforts to Prevent and Control the Spread of Herpes Simplex Virus; 2015. Available from: http://www.who.int/reproductivehealth/topics/rtis/hsv2-estimates/en/. [Last accessed on 2015 Oct 29].  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Piret J, Boivin G. Antiviral resistance in herpes simplex virus and varicella-zoster virus infections: Diagnosis and management. Curr Opin Infect Dis 2016;29:654-62.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Jiang YC, Feng H, Lin YC, Guo XR. New strategies against drug resistance to herpes simplex virus. Int J Oral Sci 2016;8:1-6.  Back to cited text no. 5
    




 

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