Indian Journal of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2010  |  Volume : 31  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 11--15

Herpes simplex virus type 2: Seroprevalence in antenatal women


Shagufta Rathore, Aditi Jamwal, Vipin Gupta 
 Department of Dermatology, Government Medical College and Hospital, Jammu - 180 001, Jammu & Kashmir, India

Correspondence Address:
Shagufta Rathore
Department of Dermatology, Government Medical College and Hospital, Jammu - 180 001, Jammu & Kashmir
India

Aims: To determine the seroprevalence of herpes simplex type 2 (HSV-2) infection in pregnant females, assess the frequency of unrecognized infection and identify the demographic profile and risk factors associated with the seroprevalence. Materials and Methods: Two hundred randomly selected, asymptomatic pregnant females attending the Obstetrics and Gynecology Outpatient Department for a routine antenatal check-up constituted the study group. Serum specimens were screened for HSV-2 infection by detecting IgG class antibodies against HSV-2-specific glycoprotein G-2 using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Results: A seroprevalence of 7.5% was found in our study. Seropositivity was maximum in the age group ≥30 years (22.20%), followed by 26-30 years (9.7%), 21-25 years (2.20%) and ≤20 years (0%). HSV-2 seropositivity was found to be significantly associated with increasing age, parity, number of sexual partners, duration of sexual activity and history of abortions (P < 0.05). No statistically significant correlation was observed between seropositivity and other demographic variables such as place of residence, education, annual family income and occupation (P > 0.05). No statistically significant association of seropositivity with present or past history suggestive of other sexually transmitted infections was found. None of our cases tested positive for human immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV). Conclusion: A relatively low prevalence of HSV-2 seropositivity was found in our study, with a high frequency of unrecognized and asymptomatic infections. Our findings suggest that type-specific serotesting could be an efficient strategy to diagnose clinically asymptomatic HSV-2 infections and, therefore, to reduce the risk of HSV-2 and HIV sexual transmission by prophylactic counseling against unprotected intercourse. It may also be a useful adjunct in detecting cases who present with symptoms not directly suggestive of genital herpes.


How to cite this article:
Rathore S, Jamwal A, Gupta V. Herpes simplex virus type 2: Seroprevalence in antenatal women.Indian J Sex Transm Dis 2010;31:11-15


How to cite this URL:
Rathore S, Jamwal A, Gupta V. Herpes simplex virus type 2: Seroprevalence in antenatal women. Indian J Sex Transm Dis [serial online] 2010 [cited 2019 Nov 13 ];31:11-15
Available from: http://www.ijstd.org/article.asp?issn=2589-0557;year=2010;volume=31;issue=1;spage=11;epage=15;aulast=Rathore;type=0