Indian Journal of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2019  |  Volume : 40  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 139--145

Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related discriminatory practices among health-care providers in apex health institutions of Bhubaneswar, Odisha


Ipsa Mohapatra, Om Prakash Panigrahi 
 Department of Community Medicine, Kalinga Institute of Medical Sciences, KIIT University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Ipsa Mohapatra
Department of Community Medicine, Kalinga Institute of Medical Sciences, KIIT University, Bhubaneswar . 751 024, Odisha
India

Context: Stigma and discrimination in health-care settings, against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients, not only affects patient care but also creates an unnecessary culture of secrecy and silence based on ignorance and fear. Aims: This study was designed to determine if there were any such discriminatory practices against people living with HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) by health-care providers at apex hospitals in the city of Bhubaneswar, Odisha. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study was designed in clinical departments, among all doctors and paramedical workers who had been providing health services to patients with HIV/AIDS for at least a year in the three large multidisciplinary tertiary care teaching hospitals in Bhubaneswar. Materials and Methods: A semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect data through in-person interviews after obtaining informed consent. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were entered into Microsoft Excel spreadsheet and were analyzed using Epi Info 7 (version 7.1.2.0); results represented using frequencies, proportions, Z-tests, and Chi-square tests. Results: Around 76.73% of the participants agreed that they were personally aware of discrimination that occurred in health-care settings. About 92.86% of the doctors, 78.12% of the nurses, while 38.09% of other health-care providers (HCPs) agreed to the fact there were some form of discriminatory practices at health facilities; this was also found to be statistically significant. As high as 88.10% of the doctors, 90.62% of the nurses, and 80.96% of other HCPs agreed that there were discriminatory practices against HIV/AIDS patients by HCPs, although this difference was not statistically significant. Conclusions: Existence of discriminatory practices in these healthcare settings was due to the lack of correct information about HIV/AIDS and lack of protective materials needed for prevention of infection transmission.


How to cite this article:
Mohapatra I, Panigrahi OP. Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related discriminatory practices among health-care providers in apex health institutions of Bhubaneswar, Odisha.Indian J Sex Transm Dis 2019;40:139-145


How to cite this URL:
Mohapatra I, Panigrahi OP. Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related discriminatory practices among health-care providers in apex health institutions of Bhubaneswar, Odisha. Indian J Sex Transm Dis [serial online] 2019 [cited 2020 Jan 25 ];40:139-145
Available from: http://www.ijstd.org/article.asp?issn=2589-0557;year=2019;volume=40;issue=2;spage=139;epage=145;aulast=Mohapatra;type=0